Monday, July 18, 2005

The Value of Criticism

I consider criticism merely a preliminary excitement, a statement of things a writer has to clear up in his own head sometime or other, probably antecedent to writing; of no value unless it come to fruit in the created work later.

--
Ezra Pound

I'm not sure I completely understand this quote, but this seemed like the sort of topic that should start with a quote. I think it means you should put your money where your mouth is.

As per a couple of comments I've received from a handful of cowardly, anonymous people: I find it interesting that I can't take criticism just because I choose to delete derogatory comments, only very occasionally, from my site.

As I've said before, isn't that the whole point of virtual reality? Having a little more control, and an alter-ego?

I'm not an anthropologist, I just play one on the internet. So your responses have been very interesting to me. I find it funny that you complain about what I delete, and then you make references to what you think I'm like in the Real World. I can turn that around on you. See, in the Real World, qualified scientific editors would throw out irrelevant, destructive criticisms rather than forwarding them on to the authors of a scientific paper. They might even send the paper out to a different reviewer altogether. Similarly, badly written or illogical papers never go out for review at all. In contrast, thoughtful letters to the editor are usually published where everyone can see them.

Sometimes, in blog-world, it's better to just leave the stupid posts up there, to embarrass the person who submitted them. Sometimes I've thought the posts embarrassed everyone and wasted space, so I got rid of them. I thought, "If I were someone who had never been to this site and I read that post, I would think the people who read this blog are all idiots." I'll let you embarrass yourself up to a point. But I'm less worried about what it says about me than what it says about you.

Having said all that, you're extrapolating, based on absolutely no data and faulty logic, if you propose that anything I do here is related in any way to what kind of faculty member I would make. And since it's not a falsifiable hypothesis, it's about as scientific as people who think that praying for strangers helps heal the world.

Amen.

4 Comments:

At 1:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

oh brother.. what kind of analogy is that? a little defensive, aren't we? LOL

in any case, you're right - your behavior on your own blog is nobody's business. You can be as rude as you like, because it your blog afterall.

good luck in your work...

here's a question for you: this is now your, what, second post-doc? what happens if you must do a third? or would you settle for some adjunct position? I'm just curious.

 
At 5:02 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Its nice to know that some people in our society are willing to work
themselves to death, sacrificing themselves and their children for the
lofty goal of tenured lab rat. Thank you, from the rest of us who
don't enjoy being exploited like you are. I guess somebody has to do
it, right?

 
At 7:07 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Isn't it ironic that Ms.PhD whines about her co-workers, her experiments, her PI and other faculty, etc, yet when she hears her colleagues complain about being a post-doc she's quick to label them as "whiners", "losers", "leeches", and "good-for-nothings"...

Wow.. talk about lack of self-reflection. If there's anyone who should stop whining here, it's the blogger herself!

there's a word for this.. someone who lacks empathy for others and feels they must blame everyone else but themselves..

I think it's called..

narcissim

 
At 7:13 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am the previous poster,

Let me just add one more thing.

The only thing embarrassing here is your hypocritical approach. I think the other posters from the previous threads were right to cross swords with you. And the only person who should be embarrassed is yourself.

 

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